Since 1619, in America, the "wrong" place always has been ANYwhere--a college tour or a Starbucks or a Waffle House--with people who feel more entitled to exist in and profit from a certain space.

Even at a Waffle House or University of Colorado, aware of the hashtags, deaths, and the fear, some people (oh, white women, I am warily, wearily looking at you) really just don't give a damn. They feel entitled enough to call the police rather than have a face-to-face conversation.

This ain't living. This is America.

One of the beautiful aspects of participating in IF: Equip is that we pull up to the table, and we get to discuss the insights of the Bible, its beauty, and its application.

Here, we talk about Ephesians 2, and what Jesus' abolishing of the dividing wall means to me.

Campbell Robertson observes a Black Exodus in his New York Times piece: there are black protestants in predominantly white congregations who can no longer abide with congregants who are deaf to our unrelenting grief and trauma, deaf to this country's foundation of systemic oppression and racism, and deaf to our warnings that they are aligning themselves with these systems rather than with God.

We're leaving.